Teeth and gums – Sage tea (video)

Picture By Petar43 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29255368

Sage – an amazing plant. Plant that has been used for centuries to cleanse negative energy at homes and anywhere else people felt presents of “bad” spirits.

Some facts about sage plant

Salvia officinalis (sage, also called garden sagecommon sage, or culinary sage) is a perennial, evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae and native to the Mediterranean region, though it has been naturalized in many places throughout the world. It has a long history of medicinal and culinary use, and in modern times it has been used as an ornamental garden plant. The common name “sage” is also used for a number of related and unrelated species.

Salvia officinalis has been used since ancient times for warding off evil, snakebites, increasing women’s fertility, and more. The Romans referred to sage as the “holy herb,” and employed it in their religious rituals. Theophrastus wrote about two different sages, a wild undershrub he called sphakos, and a similar cultivated plant he called elelisphakos. Pliny the Elder said the latter plant was called salvia by the Romans, and used as a diuretic, a local anesthetic for the skin, a styptic, and for other uses. Charlemagne recommended the plant for cultivation in the early Middle Ages, and during the Carolingian Empire, it was cultivated in monastery gardens. Walafrid Strabo described it in his poem Hortulus as having a sweet scent and being useful for many human ailments—he went back to the Greek root for the name and called it lelifagus.

The plant had a high reputation throughout the Middle Ages, with many sayings referring to its healing properties and value. It was sometimes called S. salvatrix (sage the savior). Dioscorides, Pliny, and Galen all recommended sage as a diuretic, hemostatic, emmenagogue, and tonic. Le Menagier de Paris, in addition to recommending cold sage soup and sage sauce for poultry, recommends infusion of sage for washing hands at table. John Gerard’s Herball (1597) states that sage “is singularly good for the head and brain, it quickeneth the senses and memory, strengtheneth the sinews, restoreth health to those that have the palsy, and taketh away shakey trembling of the members.” Gervase Markham’s The English Huswife (1615) gives a recipe for a tooth-powder of sage and salt. It appears in recipes for Four Thieves Vinegar, a blend of herbs which was supposed to ward off the plague. In past centuries, it was also used for hair care, insect bites and wasp stings, nervous conditions, mental conditions, oral preparations for inflammation of the mouth, tongue and throat, and also to reduce fevers.

In this video I’m talking about sage as a tea for healing gums and toothache. Make sure, if you use it, to just boil the water and take off the stove and then add sage. That way the sage tea will keep its essential oil which are the main healing substance of sage tea. In case you make sage tea for drinking, the procedure is different- you need to add sage leaves in the boiling water and leave it to boil for 3 more minutes, so that some of these oils evaporate.

My aunt healed her gums in 7 days in order to be able to get her dentures and trust me her gums were in awful state. 🙂 Hope it help you too anytime you have toothache or gums problem.

Muahaaa and shine like that star that you are!

the end

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